Category Archives: Tidbits

Mia’s Acupuncture Success Story

Mia’s Acupuncture Success Story

Dr. Kim Rotner

Mia, a nine-year-old yellow lab, was not able to get up from the floor like she used to. Her owner realized that Mia spent the majority of the day lying in her bed. She spoke to Dr. Rotner, who explained that Mia likely had an age-related condition similar to human arthritis called degenerative joint disease. Controlling inflammation and pain in affected points is key to successful management of this condition.

A physical exam revealed swollen knee joints and a decreased range of motion in both hips. X-rays and bloodwork confirmed the diagnosis and revealed elevated liver values suggesting a problem with liver function. After discussing treatment options, including conventional medicines and alternative therapies, Mia’s owner decided to pursue acupuncture as a first step. Acupuncture was a great treatment option for Mia due to its lack of side effects, especially important given her liver condition.

Mia started weekly, half-hour long treatments with Dr. Rotner. After two sessions, Mia began to rise more easily, and after one-month she began walking longer on her walks. She continued to improve over the next six weeks and remains more mobile and enjoys her daily outings. Now that her condition has improved, she will have acupuncture once a month to maintain these good results. Visit our Services page to learn more about veterinary acupuncture or call us at 978.741.2300 to schedule an appointment with Dr. Rotner.

Kim Rotner HAHC

Dr. Kim Rotner, a key part of our practice for 20 years, is a native of New York who attended Trinity College and the University of Wisconsin School of Veterinary Medicine, earning her DVM. She went on to study veterinary acupuncture and became certified by the International Veterinary Acupuncture Society (IVAS) — at the time, one of the few practitioners in the state to be so certified. In addition to her affiliation with IVAS, Dr. R. is a member of the American Veterinary Medical Association, the American Association of Veterinary Acupuncture, and the Veterinary Association of the North Shore. She lives on the North Shore with her husband, Phil, her sons, Sam and Ben, and their dog, Jib.

 

 

Wet vs. Dry Food for Cats

Wet vs. Dry Food for Cats 

Years ago we recommended dry food for cats, but we’ve learned a lot since and now recommend wet.  Wet food contains more meat, fewer carbs, and more water–all important aspects for cats who are obligate carnivores and don’t benefit from grains.  Cats in the wild get most of their water from their food.  For extensive info on feeding cats, we recommend Dr. Lisa Pierson’s website catinfo.org.  Please call us with any questions.

Dr. F. and Bebe

Dr. F. and Bebe

Here is Bebe in the flesh, the tiny kitty who is peeking ourt of Dr. F

Here is Bebe in the flesh, the tiny kitty who is peeking out of Dr. F.’s pocket in the picture on our counter.  The very same kitty who climbed to the top of the tallest tree in Marblehead at only a few months of age and swung in the breeze for hours until she was rescued.  We still remember standing under the tree with nets in case she fell.  That was hairy!